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Part of any spirng maintenance regimen is looking over all of the hoses on your boat and possibly replacing some of them that look cracked or delaminated or maybe chafed and brittle, or in some cases just plain OLD.

There have been many advances in hose technology over the years and the materials used today are far superior to compounds available 10 or even 20 years ago. Hoses fall into the area of safety concerns because they’re used to distribute fuel, and of course are the connecting link between seacocks and thru-hull fittings and engines, sink drains, holding tanks and such. If a hose fails you may be on the way to the bottom, spewing exhaust gas and water all over your engine compartment or spraying fuel all over the inside of your boat. All bad.

I’ve seen all manner of hoses used by boaters over the years and often they simply swap out a hose and use common automotive replacements, or worse. You have to understand that their are specific requirements for hose used in marine applications. I’m sorry, but like ignition protection, which I discussed earlier this week, this is just not one of those areas where you want to try and save a few dollars.

One website I refer people to all the time has done a really good job of helping boater’s figure out what hose to use for a given application:

http://www.teleflexmarine.com/shieldshose/website/ Most boaters have heard of Shields hose, which is now a division of Teleflex. The website has a picture of a boat:

 

shields boat

 

Part of any spirng maintenance regimen is looking over all of the hoses on your boat and possibly replacing some of them that look cracked or delaminated or maybe chafed and brittle, or in some cases just plain OLD.

There have been many advances in hose technology over the years and the materials used today are far superior to compounds available 10 or even 20 years ago. Hoses fall into the area of safety concerns because they’re used to distribute fuel, and of course are the connecting link between seacocks and thru-hull fittings and engines, sink drains, holding tanks and such. If a hose fails you may be on the way to the bottom, spewing exhaust gas and water all over your engine compartment or spraying fuel all over the inside of your boat. All bad.

I’ve seen all manner of hoses used by boaters over the years and often they simply swap out a hose and use common automotive replacements, or worse. You have to understand that their are specific requirements for hose used in marine applications. I’m sorry, but like ignition protection, which I discussed earlier this week, this is just not one of those areas where you want to try and save a few dollars.

One website I refer people to all the time has done a really good job of helping boater’s figure out what hose to use for a given application:

http://www.teleflexmarine.com/shieldshose/website/ Most boaters have heard of Shields hose, which is now a division of Teleflex. The website has a picture of a boat:

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